Right to Work in the UK

Who has the right to work  in the UK?If you have a new employee coming to work from abroad, you must first check that they have a right to work in the UK before you employ them

You can either:

You could face a civil penalty if you employ an illegal worker and have not carried out a correct right to work check.

There will be no change to the rights and status of EU citizens currently living in the UK until 30 June 2021, or 31 December 2020 if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

Making A Complaint About A Charity

You can complain to the Charity directly, unless you suspect illegal activity, like terrorism or abuse.

!Contact the police on 101 if you suspect illegal activity!

If you are not happy with how the charity deals with your complaint, contact the relevant regulator:

Fundraising complaints

Contact the Fundraising Regulator to complain about:

  • the way you’ve been asked for donations
  • how fundraisers have behaved

You can also complain on behalf of someone else.

Advertising complaints

Contact the Advertising Standards Authority to complain about:

  • an advertising campaign you think is offensive, deceptive or inaccurate
  • the amount of emails or mail you get from a charity

You can change how often you get emails, phone calls, texts or post from a charity using the Fundraising Preference Service.

Other serious complaints

Complain to the Charity Commission if a charity is, for example:

  • not doing what it claims to do
  • losing lots of money
  • harming people
  • being used for personal profit or gain
  • involved in illegal activity

Make a serious complaint about a charity.

If you’re a Trustee or Auditor

You can:

If You’re A Charity Employee Or Volunteer

Read how to report serious wrongdoing at a charity you work for

Maternity Leave and Pension Contributions

Image result for maternity leave and pension contributions ukYou and your employer will continue to make pension contributions if you’re getting paid during maternity leave.

The amount you contribute is based on your actual pay during this time, but your employer pays contributions based on the salary you would have received if you were not on leave.

If you’re not getting paid, your employer still has to make pension contributions in the first 26 weeks of your leave (‘Ordinary Maternity Leave’).  

Additional Maternity Leave and Pension Contributions

You will need to check your employer’s maternity policy and your contract to find out if you and your employer will have to make pension contributions.  Your employer will have to carry on making contributions afterwards if it’s in your contract.  If you do stop contributing, your employer will also stop their contributions and you will be treated as a having left the scheme.

If you’re a member of a defined contribution pension scheme, you continue to pay contributions into the scheme while you’re on paid parental leave.

The Pensions Advisory Service can give advice and more detailed information