Selling or Leasing Charity Property

Image result for selling charity propertyThere may be various reasons for disposing of your charity land. You may, for example, want to relocate the charity to more appropriate premises or release some cash that you can apply to other projects.

Before you start, you and the other trustees must be sure that:

  • you have permission to sell or lease the property – either in your governing document or in the law
  • there is nothing in your governing document that prevents you selling or leasing the property
  • your charity actually owns the title to the property
  • the sale or lease is in the charity’s best interests
  • if the property is designated for a particular purpose, such as a recreation ground, that the sale or lease doesn’t go against this

It’s usually straightforward to sell or lease charity land and property – most charities don’t need Charity Commission approval.  You must try to get the best deal for your charity and follow any rules in the law and your governing document.

More detailed information can be found here

For free property advice, guidance and workshops visit the Ethical Property Foundation

Balance Sheets

Again, it’s nothing to do with acrobatics – but we liked the picture!!

The balance sheet is the second-most-important financial statement that an accounting system produces, after an income statementA balance sheet reports on a business’s assets, liabilities, and reserves at a particular point in time

  • The assets shown on a balance sheet are those items that are owned by the business, which have value and for which money was paid
  • The liabilities shown on a balance sheet are those amounts that a business owes to other people, businesses, and government agencies
  • Reserves are the amounts that the charity has generated over the lifetime of its existence

As long as you understand what assets and liabilities are, a balance sheet is easy to understand and interpret