Guidance for Employers and Businesses on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

What you need to know

  • businesses and workplaces should encourage their employees to work at home, wherever possible
  • if someone becomes unwell in the workplace with a new, continuous cough or a high temperature, they should be sent home and advised to follow the advice to stay at home
  • employees should be reminded to wash their hands for 20 seconds more frequently and catch coughs and sneezes in tissues
  • frequently clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are touched regularly, using your standard cleaning products
  • employees will need your support to adhere to the recommendation to stay at home to reduce the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) to others
  • those who follow advice to stay at home will be eligible for statutory sick pay (SSP) from the first day of their absence from work
  • employers should use their discretion concerning the need for medical evidence for certification for employees who are unwell. This will allow GPs to focus on their patients
  • if evidence is required by an employer, those with symptoms of coronavirus can get an isolation note from NHS 111 online, and those who live with someone that has symptoms can get a note from the NHS website
  • employees from defined vulnerable groups should be strongly advised and supported to stay at home and work from there if possible

The full document can be found here

Deadlines For Filing Charitable Company Accounts

A Reminder from Companies House

If your charity is registered as a company with Companies House, and your year end is 31st March, your MUST file your company accounts with Companies House by 31st December

For other year end dates, the deadline is:

  • 9 months from the accounting reference date for a private company
  • 6 months from the accounting reference date for a public company

Please be aware of the definition of a period of months in connection with filing accounts. A period of months after a given date ends on the corresponding date in the appropriate month. For example a private company with an accounting reference date of 4 April has until midnight on 4 January of the following year to deliver its accounts, not 31 January. This does not apply if your accounting reference date is the last day of the month. In this case the period allowed for filing accounts would end with the last day of the appropriate month. For example a private company with an accounting reference date of 30 April has until midnight on 31 January of the following year to deliver its accounts, not 30 January.

If a filing deadline falls on a Sunday or Bank Holiday, the law still requires you to file the accounts by that date. To avoid a penalty, please ensure that you send acceptable accounts in time to arrive before the deadline.

It’s the date that you deliver acceptable accounts which meet the relevant legal requirements to Companies House that is important, not the date that you sent the accounts.

When To Claim Gift Aid

Crowdfunding for charities: Gift AidWhen you must claim

Your deadline to claim Gift Aid depends on how your charity is set up.

You need to claim for a donation within 4 years of the end of the financial period you received it in. This is:

  • the tax year (6 April to 5 April) if you’re a trust
  • your accounting period if your charity is a community amateur sports club (CASC), a Charity Incorporated Organisation (CIO) or a limited company

You must claim on cash donations under the Gift Aid Small Donations Scheme within 2 years of the end of the tax year that the donations were collected in.

Keeping records

You need to keep records of these donations for a further two years

How to claim

You can claim Gift Aid using Charities Online with:

For claims of over 1,000 donations you must use software.

To apply by post use form ChR1, which you can get from the charities helpline.

When you’ll get paid

You’ll get a Gift Aid payment by BACS within:

  • 4 weeks if you claimed online
  • 5 weeks if you claimed by post using form ChR1

Closing Down A Charitable Company

Related imageThe company must first of all be removed from the Companies Register but only if it:

  • hasn’t traded or sold off any stock in the last 3 months
  • hasn’t changed names in the last 3 months
  • isn’t threatened with liquidation
  • has no agreements with creditors, eg a Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA)

A company can apply to the registrar to be struck off the register and dissolved if it’s no longer needed, for example if:

  • the directors wish to retire and there is no one to take over the running of the company
  • the company is a subsidiary whose name is no longer needed
  • the company was originally set up to exploit an idea that turned out not to be feasible

More details can be found here:

Once the company has been removed from the Companies House Register, it can be removed from the Register of Charities.

A charitable company has an automatic right to expend all of its assets on its purposes.

You can tell the Charity Commission that you have wound it up by completing the closure form. This can be done online – more details  can be found here:

Pension Wise

Image result for pension wise hm governmentPension wise is a free and impartial government service that helps you understand the options for your pension pot.

Who?

Pension Wise can help if you:

  • are aged 50 or over
  • have a personal or workplace pension
  • want to make sense of your options

What?

What is a Pension Wise appointment?

  • Specialist pension guidance
  • 45 to 60 minutes
  • Over the phone or local to you

How?

How to book an appointment?

More information can be found here

Making Staff Redundant – Consultations

Related imageIf you do not consult employees in a redundancy situation, any redundancies you make will almost certainly be unfair and you could be taken to an employment tribunal.

Collective consultation

Follow these steps:

  1. You must notify the Redundancy Payments Service (RPS) before a consultation starts. The deadline depends on the number of proposed redundancies.
  2. Consult with trade union representatives or elected employee representatives – or with staff directly if there are none.
  3. Provide information to representatives or staff about the planned redundancies, giving representatives or staff enough time to consider them.
  4. Respond to any requests for further information.
  5. Give any affected staff termination notices showing the agreed leaving date.
  6. Issue redundancy notices once the consultation is complete.

More detailed information can be found here

Sick Leave and Holidays

Sick leave and holiday

Statutory holiday sicknessentitlement is built up (accrued) while an employee is off work sick (no matter how long they’re off).

Any statutory holiday entitlement that isn’t used because of illness can be carried over into the next leave year. If an employee is ill just before or during their holiday, they can take it as sick leave instead.

An employee can ask to take their paid holiday for the time they’re off work sick. They might do this if they don’t qualify for sick pay, for example. Any rules relating to sick leave will still apply.

Employers can’t force employees to take annual leave when they’re eligible for sick leave.

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When an employee changes their holiday to sick leave they’re paid Statutory Sick Pay which will count towards the amount of holiday pay they’ve received. The exceptions to this rule are:

  • they don’t qualify for Statutory Sick Pay
  • they were off work sick and being paid ‘occupational sick pay’

Charity Reserves

What Are Reserves?

Reserves are that part of a charity’s unrestricted funds that is freely available to spend on any of the charity’s purposes. This definition excludes restricted income funds and endowment funds, although holding such funds may influence a charity’s reserves policy. Reserves will also normally exclude tangible fixed assets such as land, buildings and other assets held for the charity’s use. It also excludes amounts designated for essential future spending.

Reserves also exclude funds which have particular restrictions on how they can be used. Trustees should consider for what purpose restricted funds are held and how they are being used in order to identify those resources that are freely available to spend.

You can find out much more about Reserves here

Making Changes to the Objects of your Charity

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-HC4I2B27Tik/Vtyc2klw5uI/AAAAAAAABuQ/LpMGDO131Uw/s1600/man%252Bbook-29749.pngYour charity’s objects or purposes, and the rules for how it should operate are set out in its Governing Document.

Only change your governing document if it’s in your charity’s best interest to do so. For example, if:

  • your charity’s purposes aren’t a practical or appropriate way to meet the need it was set up for any more
  • your governing document doesn’t say who your charity’s trustees are or how they are appointed
  • provisions explaining how you must run the charity (for example, how to arrange meetings) are no longer relevant or practical

As trustees, you’ll need to decide that the change is necessary and what it should be. You can make some changes yourself but others need Charity Commission permission.

More detailed information can be found here

Setting Up a Charity

FundraiserThere are 6 steps to setting up a charity.

  1. Find trustees for your charity – you usually need at least 3.
  2. Make sure the charity has ‘charitable purposes for the public benefit’.
  3. Choose a name for your charity.
  4. Choose a structure for your charity.
  5. Create a ‘governing document’.
  6. Register as a charity if your annual income is over £5,000 or if you set up a charitable incorporated organisation (CIO).

More information can be found here