How to remove a trustee from the board

IntegrityCheck your charity’s governing document to see if it has a procedure for removing trustees.

You usually need a good reason to remove a trustee, such as if they have done something that damages your charity’s reputation.

If your charity is a company, you have the right to remove a director, providing you follow the correct procedures. You have this right under the Companies Act 2006, regardless of what else is written in your articles of association.

You can hold a vote of no confidence to encourage someone to resign as a trustee. This could be part of your charity’s rules for removing a trustee, or written into its governing document. If it isn’t part of your charity’s rules, the vote has no legal power and the trustee won’t have to resign.

More details can be found here

Changing Your Charity’s Governing Document

You can apply to change your charity’s governing document. 

Before you start

You must:

You’ll need:

  • details of the changes you want to make
  • reasons for the changes
  • the date the changes were accepted by Companies House, if your charity is a company and you already have consent from the Charity Commission

You may be asked to upload your governing document as a PDF as part of the online application.

More detailed information can be found here

Rules for Charity Meetings

http://cached.imagescaler.hbpl.co.uk/resize/scaleWidth/580/offlinehbpl.hbpl.co.uk/news/NST/BoardMeeting-2016091612240187.jpgRules for Charity Meetings

Your charity’s governing document should say how and when you should organise meetings and how to vote on decisions.  You must do these things exactly as the governing document says.  If you don’t, any decision you make during a meeting could be invalid.

If your governing document isn’t clear about meetings, you should think about adding to it (or agreeing extra rules).  For example:

  • who can attend the meetings (most meetings are just for the trustees)
  • how often and when you should hold meetings
  • the minimum number that must attend a meeting so that decisions can be made properly (called the quorum)
  • how you deal with charity trustees who have a conflict of interest

Having the right rules in place for meetings will help you to make decisions effectively, manage conflicts of interest appropriately and deal with problems.

Making Changes to the Objects of your Charity

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-HC4I2B27Tik/Vtyc2klw5uI/AAAAAAAABuQ/LpMGDO131Uw/s1600/man%252Bbook-29749.pngYour charity’s objects or purposes, and the rules for how it should operate are set out in its Governing Document.

Only change your governing document if it’s in your charity’s best interest to do so. For example, if:

  • your charity’s purposes aren’t a practical or appropriate way to meet the need it was set up for any more
  • your governing document doesn’t say who your charity’s trustees are or how they are appointed
  • provisions explaining how you must run the charity (for example, how to arrange meetings) are no longer relevant or practical

As trustees, you’ll need to decide that the change is necessary and what it should be. You can make some changes yourself but others need Charity Commission permission.

More detailed information can be found here