Making A Complaint About A Charity

You can complain to the Charity directly, unless you suspect illegal activity, like terrorism or abuse.

!Contact the police on 101 if you suspect illegal activity!

If you are not happy with how the charity deals with your complaint, contact the relevant regulator:

Fundraising complaints

Contact the Fundraising Regulator to complain about:

  • the way you’ve been asked for donations
  • how fundraisers have behaved

You can also complain on behalf of someone else.

Advertising complaints

Contact the Advertising Standards Authority to complain about:

  • an advertising campaign you think is offensive, deceptive or inaccurate
  • the amount of emails or mail you get from a charity

You can change how often you get emails, phone calls, texts or post from a charity using the Fundraising Preference Service.

Other serious complaints

Complain to the Charity Commission if a charity is, for example:

  • not doing what it claims to do
  • losing lots of money
  • harming people
  • being used for personal profit or gain
  • involved in illegal activity

Make a serious complaint about a charity.

If you’re a Trustee or Auditor

You can:

If You’re A Charity Employee Or Volunteer

Read how to report serious wrongdoing at a charity you work for

Trustees Week 2015

Trustees’ Week 2015 is 2–8 November

trusteesweekbloglogo

Trustees are the people in charge of a charity. They play a vital role, volunteering their time and working together to make important decisions about the charity’s work. Trustees’ Week is an annual event to showcase the great work that trustees do and highlight opportunities for people from all walks of life to get involved and make a difference.

For more information, click here

 

Conflict of Interest

ABOUT CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

You have a legal duty to act in your charity’s best interests when making decisions as  a trustee.  If there’s a decision to be made where a trustee has a personal or other interest, this is a conflict of interest and you won’t be able to comply with your duty unless you follow certain steps.

For example, if you’re a trustee, you would have a conflict of interest if the charity is thinking of making a decision that would mean:

  • you could benefit financially or otherwise from your charity, either directly or indirectly through someone you’re connected to
  • your duty to your charity competes with a duty or loyalty you have to another organisation or person

Conflicts of interest are common in charities – having a conflict of interest doesn’t mean you’ve done something wrong. But you need to act to prevent them from interfering with your ability to make a decision only in the best interests of the charity.

Follow a 3 step approach (identify, prevent, record) so that you are able to comply with your duty and avoid:

  • making decisions that could be overturned
  • risking your charity’s reputation
  • having to repay your charity if you make unauthorised payments to trustees

Legal requirement: you MUST declare a conflict of interest immediately you are aware of any possibility that your personal or wider interests could influence your decision-making.

More details can be found here